circumcised-baby

Most people are unaware that for decades, vaccine companies have been using these foreskin cells to research, grow and develop vaccines.

(Article by Augustina Ursino republished from VacTruth.com)

Certain microorganisms used by vaccine companies need living human cells to replicate. The cells within foreskin are being used for this purpose. Foreskin cells can be used to turn a wild-type microorganism found in nature into a genetically modified microorganism for use in vaccines.

Baby foreskins are used to research rubella, varicella and human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines. They are used to make cytomegalovirus vaccines, which is something pharmaceutical companies have been working on the last few decades. This vaccine is being created using foreskin cells and clinical trials have already begun. The child’s DNA whose foreskin was used to make the vaccine cannot be fully removed from the vaccines prior to administration. Researchers are also using foreskin to create a human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) immortalized cell line for use in vaccines.

Cells isolated from infant foreskin are preferred because the infant cells have a longer lifespan than those isolated from adult foreskin. The ongoing issue with companies using infant foreskin to develop vaccines and other products is vast; only a small fraction can be discussed here. It is important to research how vaccines are made prior to receiving them, if you want to avoid unwanted contaminants in your body.

Hospitals and Clinics Can Sell Foreskin Removed from Newborns

What we call foreskin is actually part of a whole skin system in both males and females. During the male circumcision procedure, twenty to fifty percent of the skin that protects the baby’s penis is surgically removed, with or without pain medicine. There are occasions where surgical accidents happen and more is removed.

If a hospital or clinic obtained consent to use the foreskin for purposes they felt were desired, the removed foreskin may then be sold at that point, even if the baby didn’t survive.

Foreskin is being removed during a circumcision procedure.

Surgically removing the foreskin kills at least one baby boy in the United States every two days. Before being circumcised, these infants are already trying to rid their body of the toxic chemicals injected from the synthetic vitamin K shot and hepatitis B vaccine given soon after birth. These circumcision deaths usually occur from an infection that arises, trauma experienced, blood loss, or their tiny lungs burst from intense crying. This is a conservative estimate since circumcision deaths are usually not reported in the United States or elsewhere. 

Each hospital or clinic determines what can happen to the excised piece of skin. It may be discarded as biological waste, sent home with the parents who want to save it, or it may become the property of the hospital or clinic to further use for what they deem necessary, if a consent form was signed agreeing to this.

How Foreskin Cells Are Being Isolated

After the baby was circumcised, if the goal is to sell the foreskin for profit, it can be preserved and legally sold. Foreskin can also be donated.

Once the foreskin has been obtained by researchers in a lab, it is further processed. The foreskin is laid in a dish and then cut into strips. It is then soaked in an enzymatic solution to help the tissue layers separate. When ready, each strip of foreskin is peeled apart to separate the epidermal top layer from the dermal layer below that. The two layers are put in separate dishes. This is done to isolate specific cells within each layer.

The top epidermal layer of the foreskin contains cells that produce keratin, called keratinocytes. The dermis layer below contains fibroblast cells. It is these keratinocytes and fibroblast cells that are used to research, grow and develop vaccine strains.

A step by step list of this procedure is explained on the Thermo Fisher Scientific web page, titled Isolation, Primary Culture, and Cryopreservation of Human Neonatal Fibroblasts. 

From the publication:

“Isolation and cultivation of human keratinocytes from skin or plucked hair for the generation of induced pluripotent stem cells

Figure 2: Enzymatic isolation of the epidermis and the dermis.(a) Foreskin or other skin sample is placed epidermal side down (in this case, dark pigmented epidermis) and loose connective tissue is scraped away using a scalpel. (b) The tissue is cut into smaller pieces of 4–5 mm width and placed in dispase solution overnight at 4 °C. (c) The next day, the epidermis is peeled off and placed in a second dish in the medium. (d) The end result is one dish with the dermis that can be used for fibroblast isolation and the other dish with the epidermis that can be used for keratinocyte isolation.” 

There are other methods to get the foreskin to separate. 

Read more at VacTruth.com

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The Foreskin Advantage

Benefits enjoyed by males who are intact (not circumcised)

1. Full penis length and circumference. The "prepuce" (foreskin) constitutes 50% or more of the skin system of the penis [1]. If unfolded and spread flat, the average adult foreskin measures 60-90 square centimeters (10-14 square inches), or about the size of an index card. The foreskin creates a visibly longer penis, especially when the foreskin extends beyond the head of the penis. Also, the double-layered tissue of the foreskin engorges with blood during erection and creates a visibly and sensually thicker shaft and glans.When the engorged foreskin retracts behind the coronal ridge of the glans, it often creates a wider and more pronounced "ridge" that many partners find especially stimulating during penetrative intercourse. The circumcised penis appears truncated and thinner than a full-sized intact penis.

2. Protection. The sleeve of tissue known as the foreskin normally covers the glans and protects it from abrasion, drying, callusing (keratinization), and environmental contaminants. The glans is intended by nature to be a protected internal organ, like the female clitoris. The effect of an exposed glans and resulting keratinization on human sexual response has never been studied. Increasing reports by circumcised men indicate that keratinization causes a loss of sexual sensation, pleasure and fulfillment.

3. Ridged bands. The inner foreskin contains bands of densely innervated, sexually responsive tissue. They constitute a primary erogenous zone of the human penis and are important for realizing the fullness and intensity of sexual response.

4. Gliding action.  The foreskin is the only moving part of the penis. During any sexual activity, the foreskin and glans work in unison; their mutual interaction creates a complete sexual response. In heterosexual intercourse, the non-abrasive gliding of the penis in and out of itself within the vagina facilitates smooth and pleasurable intercourse for both partners. Without this gliding action, the corona of the circumcised penis can function as a one-way valve, dragging vaginal lubricants out into the drying air and making artificial lubricants essential for non-painful intercourse .

5. Specialized sensory tissue. In addition to the "ridged bands" mentioned above, thousands of coiled fine-touch receptors (Meissner’s corpuscles) constitute the most important sensory component of the penis [1]. The foreskin contains branches of the dorsal nerve and between 10,000 and 20,000 specialized erotogenic nerve endings of several types, which are capable of sensing slight motion and stretch, subtle changes in temperature, and fine gradations in texture.

6. The frenulum. This is a highly nerve-laden web of tissue that tethers the inner foreskin to the underside of the glans [see photo]. It is similar to the frenula found under the tongue, the upper lip and the clitoral hood (female foreskin). For many intact men, the penile frenulum is a male "G-spot" that is highly pleasurable when repeatedly stretched and relaxed during sexual activity. Depending on the surgical method used, the frenulum is partially to completely destroyed by circumcision.

7. Proper blood flow. The foreskin contains several feet of blood vessels, including the frenular artery and branches of the dorsal artery. The loss of this rich vascularization interrupts normal blood flow to the shaft and glans of the penis, damaging the natural function of the penis and altering its development.

8. Immunological defense. The soft mucosa of the inner foreskin produces plasma cells, which secrete immunoglobulin antibodies, and antibacterial and antiviral proteins, such as the pathogen-killing enzyme called lysozyme. All of the human mucosa (the linings of the mouth, eyelids, vagina, foreskin and anus) are the body's first line of defense against disease. This benefit of the foreskin could be one possible explanation why intact men are at lower risk of chlamydia and other sexually transmitted diseases.

9.  Langerhans cells. These specialized epithelial cells are a component of the immune system and may play a role in protecting the penis from sexually transmitted infections such as HIV (AIDS).

10. Proper lymph flow. The foreskin contains lymphatic vessels, which are necessary for proper lymph flow and immunological functioning.

11. Estrogen receptors. The foreskin contains estrogen receptors, whose purpose is not yet fully understood and needs further study.

12. Apocrine glands. These glands produce pheromones, nature’s invisible yet compelling signals to potential sexual partners. The effect of their absence on human sexual behavior has never been studied.

13. Sebaceous glands. The oils produced by these glands lubricate and moisturize the foreskin and glans, so that the two structures function together smoothly.

14. Dartos fascia. This is a smooth muscle sheath that underlies the scrotum, the entire penis and the tip of the foreskin. It is necessary for proper temperature regulation of the genitals (causing these structures to elongate in the heat and shrink in the cold). Approximately half of the Dartos fascia is destroyed by circumcision.

15. Natural texture and coloration of the glans. In the intact penis, the glans normally appears moist, shiney, and pinkish-red to dark purple. These visual cues often attract and excite a sexual partner. The glans of a circumcised penis is dry, rough and often light pink to bluish-gray in color [see photos].

16. Zero risk of serious infection or surgical injury.  Unfortunate boys who suffer botched circumcisions lose part or all of their penis from surgical mishap or subsequent infection. They are often "sexually reassigned" by castration and "transgender surgery." They are relegated to a life of hormone therapy and are compelled to live their lives as pseudo-females, the success of which has never been fully assessed [24-46].

17. Zero risk of death from surgery. Every year boy die from the complications of circumcision, a fact that the American circumcision industry ignores, obscures, or downplays.

18. Zero risk of delayed or diminished maternal bonding. Circumcision, even if anesthesia is used, causes unavoidable operative trauma and post-operative pain that has been shown to disrupt bonding with the mother, which in turn interferes with the first developmental task of every human, that of trust (trust in human contact, in personal safety, etc).

19.  Electromagnetic "cross-communication." Anecdotal reports suggest that, without the mucosa of its foreskin, the penis lacks the capacity for the subtle electromagentic energy transfer that occurs during contact between two mucous membranes (the vaginal walls and the exposed inner lining of the foreskin). Such contact contributes to the full experience of sexual pleasure. These reports deserve further scientific study.

20. The foreskin is necessary for optimal health and well-being of the male, as well as contributing to fulfillment
in his sexual relationships.